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Adventures of a Modern Pirate: January 2019

“An Abaco Blue Hole,” my uncle said as I pondered, images of Captain Kirk and Spock staring fixedly at a large blue hole flashing across my mind. 

“It’s a large hole in the ground that usually leads to caves beneath the ground,” Tom added. “Very cool to see and swim in.” 

As if on cue, Evelyn appeared with a black three-ring photo album, turned a few thick pages, and pointed. There before me was the image of a large hole in the ground filled with captivating blue water, and it was obvious the center was dark, deep and intimidating. Mild trepidation rippled through me. 

“It’ll be fun!” Evelyn said. “Let’s go!” 

Within minutes, the boat was skimming the ocean, and just like that, I was watching a stunning blonde in a black bikini gazing fixedly toward the coming adventure wearing a wide smile. Large sunglasses complemented her adventurist face like a National Geographic journalist. Beers were opened and passed around nonchalantly. I nursed the first swig, getting my insides to work, then I finished the beer and asked for another. 

We went north along the coast line past Cherokee Sound, Snake Cay and Hope Town, where Peter made a northwest turn and onward. After an equable ride, we stopped at Green Turtle Ferry dock, where we had the boat docked and secured in minutes. The view around me was just as I had gotten used to: beautiful. Everything exuded tranquility. 

From the dock, we headed south on foot along the main road. After approximately two and a half miles, we turned off to the left onto an inconspicuous road, where about 500 yards later, we came face to face with a sapphire blue hole in the ground. I half expected other tourists, but the place was silent and devoid of people. The dark azure shape was a huge contrast to the light-turquoise sea I had gotten used to in the Caribbean. 

“Rumor has it, it’s about 200 feet deep,” Peter said, looking downward. 

“This will be fun,” my uncle added, also gazing downward. 

And just like that, I saw a flash to my left, and before I knew it, Evelyn ran past us and headlong dove in. I caught a glimpse of her outstretched body and that gorgeous rear end just as she disappeared. 

She reappeared a ways out, and waving, she hollered, “Hurry up, scaredy-cats! Jump in!” 

We did! 

Gotta get back to my coconut concoctions . . .

Joshua MacLeod is a NSB local and a Florida native. He is the author of Savage Tango and Chasing Latitudes. He lives with his dogs, Durango, Higgins and Oscar.

This column is part of an ongoing story of tales from the past that continues each month. Read Josh’s previous columns here:

To read more about Josh’s new novel, click here!

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